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for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in californi
of making everything a process like public art would be really challenging in an environment like san francisco. so, i think every city is different. san francisco would be drastically affected if we adopted something that stringent. >> i just wanted to speak to -- a little bit to [speaker not understood] speaking about the vancouver program. and i do have some experience with that. ways also a coordinator of murals. and one of the benefits of having a process, whether that's a permit, whether there's a fee attached to that, whether there's a committee or if it simply goes through a process where different departments of the city can have input. for example, in vancouver and really the vancouver graffiti management mural program is almost identical to what tyra is talking about doing here. it's similar to public art murals, but similar in scope. when we were doing our murals, almost 200 of them, there was no permit in place, but there was a selection process. and, so, if that was the heritage property, that had to go to heritage. and they had to decide whether or not that building ha
's happening so if the artist is threatened in any way, there is some awareness they are in that environment, number one. number two, what we found are a lot of the artists in our program are of the street culture. so, they know when tags are just tagging and what's vandalism, gang related or more serious. we had one particular incident at 65 oak grover, a beautiful mural, and it was slightly obliterated. he went back and fixed it. and then they came back and completely obliterated it. and he told me he could not go back up there because the people that did that would hurt him and he knew who it was. so, instead of hiring another muralist to go up there because he gave us that information, we just had -- we buffed it over and had a blank coat of paint put over it. so, in our program we can utilize the artists to get the information we need to keep them safe and also we let the police -- law enforcement know this program is happening and when it's happening so that they're hypersensitive to it. >> i'm going to go back over here and we have a couple comments. i think we're going to stick with
's an opportunity for car pooling and school pool. there is another program with the department of environment that we're collaborating with and we're hoping to address that issue. >> so, very quickly, moving on, just some quick lessons learned on how we can improve our program. again, parent caregiver outreach is crucial. we really need to reach the whole family, not just the students. and not just the staff at the school. it's really the parents and caregivers are key. and that regular walking and rolling events are critical in getting more families out there walking and biking. and, so, we want to establish these regular walking school buses and regular bike training either separately or together. what we're proposing to do with the cycle [speaker not understood] from mtc, there are a number of changes and a number of things we'd like to keep. first of all, we'd like to expand the program right now. we're working in 15 schools. we'd like to explain that to 40. this is the only source of funding that actually allows -- the only source of grant funding that allows us to go up to high school.
is at work. everybody is on this. in that kind of an environment with a large city like this, large police department, obviously the first responders on the scene are race volunteers, runners themselves, passersby. and emts. how does it work practically to have the foeb in charge? the n fbi is coordinating it. what does that mean when they're dealing with a large sort of resources. >> first of all, new in being a real attack is not new to the city of boston, the state of massachusetts and the federal authorities up there. back in 2011, just over two years ago, and previously before that the federal government in conjunction with boston did exercises exactly to prepare for situations like this. so what you have is the immediate response is always going to be governed by the boston police department and fire department. and then over team there will be a transition to the fbi. but most importantly, this has to be done hand in hand. the state, local and federal cooperation, this isn't honestly like the movies, where the fbi shows up and says we're in charge now. the relationship between the f
started working war college, every faculty member was high up as a full professor. in an environment where they are so right conscious, the idea of hiring people, all faculty members as a full professor is just unheard of and hurt the institutional credibility. trying to explain that to a kernel of why they should not be a full professor fell on ears. this is a problem how to administrators who really have no experience is part of the problem. the other part of the problem and i'll be honest i'll be writing a following chapter of the department chair from the naval war college, captain tony were body are doing a book chapter that was the oversight? with the supervision? there to supervising organizations with something called military education coordinating council -- the military loves acronyms. a part of the pentagon called the g7, part of the joint staff. the congress is busy. we on the sequestration is basically taking up all of their time. the economy. now that allows those in the pentagon and those that this military coordinating council, to basically it our what i've been told they
an environment that both of us could write about. >> bill: you write about a terror attack in boston and then it actually happens. when it happened what went through your mind? >> shock. very upsetting. period. i mean, nobody wants that to happen. we even had an incident in water town in the book. and this muslim brotherhood and started in boston and expands. >> your tears are mumples? >> muslim brotherhood, absolutely. >> bill: you can't do that you just heard our muslim guest. >> of course you can we can and we will. not all muslims are a terrorist. everyone that is attacking us happens to be. >> i don't think president obama is going to read your book. >> i tried to get in the white house. it hasn't happened yet. >> maybe you if you said unnamed terrorists. >> book from me to the white house i don't see it happen. >> the book is bed terrorist. mocking cnn for terror coverage. crowley and colmes. one of the murdered three americans before the attack last week. investigation is going on. we hope you stay tuned to those reports. ... but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can
other factors which may have been present in the environment. in fact, we won't know with some certainty until the laboratoryratory completes its final review. revie away from the scene yesterdayerday afternoon the gttf began its investigation. immediately after theinve bombing the fbi initiate add a command coand post. those assigned to the jttf and other agent associated with jttf and many others on their own including boston, police, more than 1,000 law enforcement enfo across many agencies have beenn assigned to this investigationation via the command post. they began canvassing sources reviewing government and public source databases ask conducting condu interviews with eye wonses eyewitnesses toses determine who is responsible forresp this crime. we are doing this methodically,y, carefully yet with a sense of urgency. all across the nation and around the world the force of the united states is working hard to to locate those responsible.responsibl already the fbi has received more than 2000 tips as of noon ofoon today. many of which have already been reviewed analyzed
of the environment. >> trauma surgeon explaining that there have been doctors in surgery since early this morning. he's been in surgery since 8:00 this morning. he's performed several surgeries on the injured victims of today's bombings. the bombings took place at approximately 2:50 p.m. local time. the trauma surgeon reporting one of his medical partners here at massachusetts general has military experience and has served in both iraq and afghanistan. the doctor describing that experience, that wartime experience as being apparently very useful today. as doctors treated some of the more than 130 people who were injured. there are many, many unanswered questions tonight. including unconfirmed reports about other potentially explosive devices. found on or near the scene of the bombings today. law enforcement officials have not confirmed that there were other unexploded bombs for lack of a less specific but more politic term. as of tonight the official confirmation is that there were two devices. only two. those were the two that caused the massive explosions. to the extent that there were other device
information about their subject through their dress and environments. like many photographs taken today 17th century portraits were taken from weddings. from 1625 him and his wife are exceptional examples of large scale marriage portraits. other typical occasions for commissioning portraits were births. capture the innocence of a beloved child. one of rembrandt's pupil. we see why he became a painter. the child's face reveal his own mature vocabulary. for those who have seen the exhibition it's exhibited next to rembrandt's work and you can see the two side by side. from this period, who was most famous for his self portraits. at the time, the paintings, is a copy of the original tradition of rembrandt. here you see the two paintings together which makes a subtle variations evident. the angle of the head and more controlled and refined manner of the brush work and copy on the left suggest that these paintings are probably not by the same hand. we now have scientific evidence which further suggest that the morris picture is a studio copy perhaps by the talented artist gart who is rembrandt'
've taken a lot of time to benefit the environment and it will be a benefit to the neighborhood and to the neighbors with the view of their house. i really think this is a great design for a family house their maintaining what's there and they're asking for the variance to be maintained. i really support that project. thank you very much >> thank you any other public comments? please step forward >> good evening maybe i'm the last one we can all go home arrest i'm frank morris. my family as lived in this area for over 70 years. i've lived they're there for 3 seven years. tights real a shame we're here at this point. we all want our neighbors to get what they need but not as an expense to the neighborhood. first one was the variance that took the two parking spaces in their driveway sometimes there's 3 cars in that driveway. they were allowed to take the garage space and make that that an apartment. the second thing is the variance allows the building to be the highest densest on the block. i have 2 thousand square foot on exactly 4 though square feet they have 21 hundred and t
through their dress and environments. like many photographs taken today 17th century portraits were taken from weddings. from 1625 him and his wife are exceptional examples of large scale marriage portraits. other typical occasions for commissioning portraits were births. capture the innocence of a beloved child. one of rembrandt's pupil. we
of it is just demand in the economy. >> market environment. >> part of it was the premiums being added in because of the uncertainty about how it was going to play out. >> there was all set in the competition played a huge part.
of drivers produces an environment of teamwork. additionally there has been sefrmentd that local customers have made inquiries about the health of the drivers in san francisco. the idea has received great reviews. to the issuance of madalinas this program has produced the lease amount of - i would strongly encourage the enhancement of this program in the future >> (calling names). >> again evening board of directors. i want to thank the doctor on his report. i have a couple of concerns that were brought up on the town hall meeting. the w hotel is on the corner of third and howard. if you're coming down third on a rush hour period it's going to be about 5 tow 7 minutes because when everybody comes to that threshold of montgomery. if you look at june the 14th of that day there was a giant against the houston as atrocities which means south of marketing is a mess. so there are other drorgsz be made there. i want to thank the director for trying to get more inspectors to help with the enforcement hopeful that won't be nitpicking with a madalinas on your shoulder. it 50 should be a rent basis
own environment and house and recovery and your neighbors are doing the same the city as a whole will be a more resilient city. >> we are all proud of living in san francisco and being prepared helps us stay here. >> so, thank you so much for joining us today, alicia, i appreciate it. >> absolutely, it is my pleasure. >> and thank you for joining us on another edition of building >> hi, i'm corn field and welcome to doing building san francisco, we are doing a special series, called stay safe, how you can stay in your home safely and comfortable, and we know that an earthquake is coming and there are things that you can do to reduce the effects of the earthquake on your home. let's take a look at that. >> here at the spur urban center on mission street in san francisco talking about staying in your home after an earthquake. i have guests today, pat buscavich and his dog, harvey and david, and both structural engineers and we want to talk about things that you might do before an earthquake to your home to make it more likely that your home will be ha bitable after an earthquake, w
environment. now, people are a lot more positive about the u.s., so they're overweighting the u.s. the s. is still ary, very strong mark so many overweight that. and we're seeing a lot of regions like europe where investors are pretty much hands-off. so it depends, really, when you ask about how investors behave, where they come from, what region they're located in, and what region they invest in. european investors are, i would say, largely sitting on the sidelines. >> i'm going to come back to you in a moment. but let me ask you first about what's going on in the united states. a big debate about when the federal reserve is going to start winding down the stimulus. is there a downside risk to all of this free money, whether you look at what the fed has been doing with qe or what japan has been doing in terms of the stimulus there, the ecb as well. >> well, yes, it's very clear that central banks have been playing a very dominant role in the economy over the last couple of years. when i was at the imf meetings but still in davos, the talk was the central banks are still the only game in
of the stability of the environment you're in. >> the building department will typically require that kind of information. people will do a major edition. what we are wondering is why we require that information. >> great, thank you very much. it is terrific. it is fun to see a lot of the city. thank you. [train whistle blowing] global warming. [whistle blows] some say irreversible consequences are 30 years away. 30 years? that won't affect me. [brakes screech] [horns honking] [siren wails] announcer: big dreams and goodrades aren't enough to get into college. there are actual steps you need to take. finding someone who can help is the first and most important. for the next steps, go to knowhow2go.org. >>> while i get myself settled, maybe a show of hands. how many already been to see the exhibition? a number of you. first of all let me say good afternoon and first and foremost i would like to thank my colleagues in the education department in the fine arts museum of san francisco for an allowing me to speak today. valuable artwork -- rene, director of public programs and last on this li
. 2008 - 11 e which seas the impacts on the environment which could result from implementation. staff is not here today to respond to comments such comments will be responded in writing which will respond to ail comments during the public comment period and this is not a hearing to disapprove or approve the project. comments today should be directed for the adequacy of the project >> commenters should state their name and address so thel they can have a copy of the projects comments. we'll take any comments from the planning commission and the public comment extended to the april 29, '96. since this is a local san francisco project this is the only draft. i recommend that the public hearing be opened. okay opening it up to public comment. tim kennedy. >> hello, i'm timmy live on 41 avenue. i'm coming here today because i'm a certified person. my prim certain is not with the underground water. my prim certain is with the pipeline location. and particle with the south sunset well location. if the eir the well, is located on 40 and the pipeline will make a 90 degree it goes up one bloc
is above sea level rise and certainly when we talk about the environment. as the title of this panel says, along green view. it is absolutely about how the complexities of human decision making, human settlement, individual ambition, always contradictory emotions of people have shape not only what the environment is, we impact it and give them access. but how we think of it to my we formulate the idea of the wild and now often that is based on these often very self-serving tropes that we invented. so the environment is about history, human action. and in this but what i tried to do is to show how some of those crosscurrents work. he said sell thing boils down to the final decisive battle but against the indians to have been an extremely aggressive northern plains tribe who had been the ones first to master horses and had arranged absolutely right through the yellowstone country hunting in the fire all, for example. once there were dealt with the exploration could continue, but one last cautionary note goes back to the question of prison. i think it is very easy when people look at this bo
every time i walked into the room because that would change the environment. i change the environment because i was always present but i didn't always want him to interact because i really wanted to document real moments and not change anything. so, that was my role. >> host: you write that it was magical whenever president bush and his father were together. there are a lot of photos of the two presidents bush in this book. >> guest: first of all they look so alike which is really interesting and anytime they were together it was like history in the making because you have two presidents together, father and son. the second son of the president to become president and it was always really interesting photographing them together as a family. they are so normal in lots of ways other than the fact that they are two presidents together. i really enjoyed documenting the family and the entire bush family. >> host: and did you get to know mrs. bush as well? >> guest: i did. >> host: i want to ask about this photo on a very very long couch. how did this come about? >> guest: this was inside t
the environment. this has been through months of community outreach it's been changed foments. unfortunately, this most of us in the wrong direction. its promise is one that we have not had enough time to appeal. the bid before you is a simple one should we adopt rules that move forward please support supervisor wooenz legislation >> good afternoon coordinator of the sequa improvement team and happy earth day. today is earth day. i want to remind sequa and earth day were born in the seem time period. it's the strongest tool that the community has this sequa. and we should not take amendment the sequa process lightly. and even though we can't all the time the state law wherever you are asking the community to change sequa you're asking to change state law. and especially earth day is a time to take this seriously. supervisor weaning a lot of your amendments look interesting, however, we would also is a we spinster a lot of work working on the legislation that supervisor kim put forward and it's much more elegant a solution at this point. we want to make sure we wait until supervisor kim's le
enrichment services, and all other capturing a healthy environment. thank you. >> i am a resident for more than 20 years. three years ago our community had some program for our asian residen residents, which by the way is largest in district 10. last year services for us have reduced to the point this semester all of our
in san francisco. demonstrators spoke out against the stress of the environment and public health. among the protested the proposed key pipeline and pollution in low income community. all day we have been sweating out. our meteorologist rosemary is here. >> we have several and today is think i think is going to be the hottest day. let's take a look at some of the numbers from today. areas like oakland and san francisco broke the record. 88 in mountain view, all those in orange records set today. and i have to say, i want you to keep in mind there are many communities where the national weather service does not keep track of the record. so i am sure there are communities out there that probably topped it had record today but we just don't have that information. 74 in napa right now. it's still a nice evening out there. for some it's still a summer night. half hour until the sun set so we are on our way into a mild evening but i am beginning to see a change in the weather pattern. take a look here. we have had this northerly westg the fog out of the area. take a look. we got the surge comi
seas caused by the current fiscal environment. yesterday in boston, the nation began to pay tribute and final respects to those killed in last week's senseless violence. the collective hearts of our coast guard family go out to the people of boston and all the families that have been harmed by this tragedy. but they also go out because the coast guard is a part of that community in boston, and we were able to respond immediately with boats and cruise and armed helicopter, vessel boarding teams and overall enhancement of maritime transportation security posture. our ability to respond like this, not only in boston, but in all our ports, is a direct result of the support that we've received from the congress and the administration over the last 12 years. the results of that support were also demonstrated during hurricane sandy when we rescued 14 crewmembers from the sailing ship h.m.s. bounty in 30-foot seas and 60 knot winds 80 miles offshore. we're also part of the community in new york and new jersey, so we were pleased to be able to get the port running again after the storm and w
to a safe and supportive learning environment. and we know that the right to that environment is critical to having an education. schools across california, including some of the state's largest school districts, are already accepting and supporting their transgender students and that's something that we're proud of to do here in san francisco, but we need to do more. and one of the things that is happening with many of these students is that you look at the suicide rates and their high. and it's important for san francisco to continue to speak out in support of these students. and, so, i ask for your support for passage of assembly bill 12 66. i want to thank my colleagues for their co-sponsorship, supervisor wiener, supervisor mar, supervisor avalos, and supervisor kim. the rest i submit. >> thank you, supervisor campos. supervisor chiu. >> thank you, colleagues. i have a brief item i'm introducing a resolution to urge the california state legislature to pass assembly bill 900 which would reverse reductions that were made in our state budget process a few years ago in medi-cal reimburse
an encreasing challenge to america's military. this is the environment that is facing the department of defense as it enters a third year of flat or declining budgets. the onset of these constraints has led to belt tightening in military modernization, force structure, personnel costs and overhead expenditures. it has given us the opportunity to reshape the military and reform defense institutions to better reflect 21st century realities. the process began under the leadership of secretary gates. secretary gates curtailed more than 30 modernization programs and trimmed overhead costs within the military services and across the defense enterprise. the realignment continued secretary panetta who crafted new strategic guidance in an f.y. 2013 defense budget plan which reduced the department's top line by $487 billion over the course of a decade. the president's request of $526.6 billion for fy 2014 continues to implement the president's defense strategic guidance and enhances the department's efforts at institutional reform. most critically, it sustains the quality of the all-volunteer force and t
is a matter of social justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question
in our first panel, business creating a healthy safe and inclusive environment for all school students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing eve
that that kind of environment will propagate. >> and let me jump in there to try to- to put it in the framework of the class. that is the difficulty. that is the difficulty, because we have, you know, from an ethical point of view, where we're moved towards an understanding that is inclusive- we're being asked to treat other human beings in a way that is not so self-centered. but both of you, actually, i think are saying very similar things, which is there seems to be a problem in that inherent selfishness finds its way into any culture in any religion. what you're saying, susanna, really strikes me with the law profession, is that if you're- and we're back to the experiential dimension- if you conceive of yourself as the spoke in the wheel, you're the hub, the world revolves around you and everybody else is going to ultimately be after you, then it's very difficult to not take the newspapers, to not want to find a way to get ahead, to jump ahead. but you know, that's the way it is in society. warren, go ahead; you've had your hand waving. >> i always hear that this is a very litigious society
the virus grows, if you follow the metaphor that bullying is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that
-- [inaudible] the serious threat assessment our threat environment is changing. threats are more interconnected and viral. defense which it first -- disruption with the u.s national interest. i would ketrn to a few of the issues e identify in the statement for the record. our statement to the lead was cyber. as mor more state and demonstrate actors gained expertise. it's important to reach a global threat cannot be overstated. this year our discussion natural resources also more prominent because climb in disease and competition for natural resources and huge national security implications. many import are extreme war and food stress that can destablize governments that can trigger conflict. on the issue of terrorism, the threat from al qaeda and the potential for a massive coordinated attack on the united may be diminished. but it's more diffuse. as the president stated on tuesday about the boston marathon bombing we don't know it was planned by an group effort or individual act. lone inspire our affiliated group are determined to attack. the turmoil in the arab world brought a spike in threat
for qualified new students. learn more at devry.edu. 4 >>> for some it is a chance to help the environments by paying the dmv extra and buying a special license plate. our state lost millions of dollars by failing to collect that money. ktvu's ken pritchett is live with more. >> reporter: here is one of those license plates. they cost $50 to get. $40 a year to renew. in this audit, it accuses the dmv of not collecting and not charging enough for the plates and over the years it added up. >> reporter: some plates show love for sfo. others belong to lawyers and this one needs explaining. >> i have a yellow and black mini. looks like a bee. >> reporter: she paid extra the plate. now it seems that money was not being selected or spent correctly. >> i am not surprised. >> reporter: it is the auditor's office that found the problem, having to do with the sale of the license plates. plates that help the environment, art and more. >> department of motor vehicles has foregone $22.2 million over two years. >> reporter: the dmv failed to collect $12 million and under charged by $10 million. >> for a c
that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor
and i can remember it is in the urban environment where a terrorist is loose with the potential device that is a suicide best if got into a large area he could kill a lot of people so they went to quarantine block by block why there's so many people present there is a blood flow he is lending and people would realize who he was a piece surfaced on the streets so they know that is why it is quarantined. >> these do terrorist remained in close proximity year this scene of their crime,,the scene of the bombings and i think authorities made some pretty good judgments as to whether or not he was much beyond that and a recent successfully he did not it is an impressive display to this point* to managed to contain these to a terrorist as we talk about their lack of training and resources creating a calamitous results. we are getting word now from local media that a neighbor on franklin street has seen police check about that was in her yard -- a boat and we're getting this from local media channels since there was something different about the vote or whatever cover was on its a and called po
in these type of environments and we were able to really take those and learn more about each other for future responses. we were able to take and provide a taylored response package to better serve the customer. again, we don't want to go in with a full package that the state or civil environments aren't really asking for, we want to be sure it's taylored appropriately and it's responsive and timely. we also had the humanitarian assistance coordination center. that's the place we were able to take the non-governmental agencies and the hoetion nation international agencies and have them interacting and coordinating with the military folks so that we were able to provide an understanding of how we all work together. so if you want additional information, if you want to talk to captain napalitano, he is the commanding officer for the expeditionary training group, and he is the -- in charge of the people that train and certify that crisis response adaptive force package. his folks also put together the different events for this, for the exercise. the apan provides us an opportunity to be able
aspects. >> what better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ . >> this class is managing a disaster. what happens and how do we fit in? emergency operation plan, everything is going to go through the mayor. you have the office of emergency services, everything is supposed to come together over on turk street. that's where the
consciousness about the environment and life and so forth. so, i'm wondering when i was in a graffiti advisory board, several of us tried to get some special attention paid to those things as well as glass etching. i don't know if glass etching has gotten worse or not, but particularly graffiti on concrete sidewalks and curbses and trees. i'm wondering if perhaps officer parerra [speaker not understood] can speak to that if any special efforts are made to address those. >> i'll speak to it. when we invoked the blight ordinance, we recently had it changed. we have now put that -- we were doing it as a department. we were doing the abatement for the sidewalks. sidewalks are actually private property. so, we have now changed that and put the property owner responsible for the graffiti on the sidewalks. that may be why you're seeing a slight increase. the department was doing that all over the city. as resources dwindled, and we recognized we were already noticing the property owner put private graffiti on their property, we added the sidewalks. so, that may be a reason why you're seeing that incr
their support for the environment by banning plastic shopping bags. we sent kpix 5's len ramirez to find out the pros and cons. >> reporter: allen, i'm here in san jose. and san jose was one of the first big cities to have a bag ordinance in effect. it's been going on for more than a year so a lot of folks are getting used to the idea. and regular shoppers say it is now the new normal. >>> reporter: life after the plastic bag ban in san jose. >> i'm glad you asked. >> reporter: a year and five months since it's been on the books, and it's not a sad sack story for jill malone. >> you know, i just have a bunch of bags in my car. if i forget sometimes i just put the food in a cart and i put it -- bag it in the trunk m i think it>> rte but others complain about paying the extra dime f recyclable bag if they come shopping without them. >> it's a pain to buy them when i forget them. >> reporter: more cities are banning plastic bags including 12 new cities in san mateo county. plastic bags end up as litter, clog storm drains, don't biodegrade as easily and most are made out of unrecyclable material
the chief of production goals from unconventional shell plays, i think the environment going forward has never looked brighter for u.s. infrastructure. >> i think et was yesterday someone said nat gas is the new safe haven, suddenly this is start to go look a little more price afforded. any view on that? >> i think that dmodty prices, a broader view, i think that peak energy, we believe in just the opposite at yorkville. we think energy prices will probably be the growth driver of the global economy. it has a lot of implications. it's very good for the u.s. and our consumers. it's very good for china. >> you say peak energy in terms of we're going to see declines -- >> i think we're going to see stability. the new energy supplies coming online are more expensive to extract from the ground, so you're not going to get back to $20 a barrel oil in our lifetime. but this $80 to $11 is 00, peaking at $120 dropping to $60 is probably a new range in the u.s. i see natural gas, it's at 350 right now, roughly, $4 to $6 range, $16 in japan, mid teen prices in germany. that's giving us a competitive
with the up-tempo nature of the opposed. we had two divisions they are. can be a highly stressful environment and as a young captain eric two years back and so for me it's somewhat personal. i was also a judge advocate there. i prosecuted cases and another prosecutor. he's a former defense defense attorney very well. i want to try to get to if we can clarity on the issue, which sthink of is e theydes my first question is, and if you could keep these answers as much as possible to yes or now so i can get through his many s possible, did dod officials consort you are members of your department regarding the decision to designate attacks on military and civilian personnel at the mac to work with violence? >> this is answer that is not yes or no. i'm just not familiar when interaction with advocate a part of defense with regard to this issue. >> of the witness would yield. this is a gentleman prosecuted by dod, by the department of defense, not the department of justice. john mchugh is a former republican is in his second term in the obama administration. this is a military procedure in terms of
the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. the immigration bill is hot and heavy, front and center. marco rubio did ginsburg in espagnole. he had five sunday shows, to talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. outink the guns may come not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. mexico, the united states, now japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance to help bring nafta into the 21st century. the three are very much on the u.s. agenda. it shows great forward progress. welcome all of you to what promises to be a truly fascinating session. be second reason this will terrific is because of our panelists. i will say little bit more about the ambassador of mexico. doris meissner, who i served with in the clinton administration. she is one of our grea
-rich environment for the terrorists. we've been waiting for a long team for the next incident, and tragically it just happened today in boston. >> governor, what do you glean from the information that we do have at this hour? what do you glean from the fact there was about a 14-second interval before the second bomb went off? what do you glean from the fact that there were other devices that were, thankfully, found by the police department and they were able to detonate them? does it fit any one pattern of any group? i know it's speculation, but. >> sure. first of all, i want to compliment you, you said we have more questions than answers and i think that's important. we don't want to answer our own questions until we get more information. my view has changed just even in the past couple hours. we know it was a rudiment try, fundamental device. mark furman said you can probably make a similar device with ingredients from your own home. but at one time it was two devices and one two undetonated now there may be as many as five. then the question becomes is there one person involved? unlikely,
environment, because we know what's going on there. let's go inside intel numbers right now. joining me now is intel cfo, stacy smith, in a first on cnbc interview. mr. smith, good to have you on the program. how would you characterize the quarter? >> the demand environment played out as we expected, and i think the company executed well. as i just heard jon say, we saw fis growth in our data center business. it was up 7% year on year. and within the overall market for computing, we're seeing nice growth. and there's obviously a transition going on there, but i think we're well positioned for that as well. >> and shareholders certainly want to see change in terms of utilizing the balance sheet, which you've done quite well. we're going to get to that in a moment. but you said that the demand part of the story played out the way that you expected. in other words, you are expecting pc sales to go down? >> well, what we're seeing is a transition within the overall client category. and so if you think about it, what we're seeing is very robust growth in new form factors. things like ultra books
access to them in our modern media environment it's so fractured that people are targeting small niches. how do i get young males or middle aged women or black people, and unfortunately i think some media outlets decided to use pledge dirks stereo type, even close to racism to draw in an audience and keep the audience on their platform rather than going to others. so what i try to do in this book, i try to explore that a little bit. try toy describe why that is happening and help people diffuse these things so they can recognize it when they seive it on fox news channel, on msnby, on the drudge report, they have a sense of what is going on, and they're made more media literate and they can response in a way that makes sense. >> host: eric deegans is our guest. the book "race-baiter." the numbers are on the screen. >> host: you can also contact m-deegans by social media. our >> mr. deegans, you used the term coded language. what does that mean? >> guest: well, there's lot of ways -- because i say one of the great successes of the civil rights movement is that we have reached the point wh
created a tense environment for many american muslims. while authorities have not released any information linking the alleged attack to religion, american muslims fear that the minds of some are already made up. >> it is a unique thing being a minority within the united states. it is not often like a when a white christian blows something up. and it is a fine line, there is a feeling of dread we're hoping they're not muslim. however, in the bay area we have some reports of hate incidents. fortunately, nothing has escalated to violence with people being confronted to that because of their apparent".their apparent religion." >> zarha goes on to say that muslims like herself, who are civil rights lawers, doctors and teachers are representatives of the larger american muslim community and what they want to contribute to the united states. >> the giants are not taking any chances at a-t-and- t park. for last night's ball game, once again they stepped up security precautions. although there were long lines, most fans were in good spirits and went with the flow. >> better safe than sorry. >> thi
? are we in a inflationary environment or a deflationary environment? lastly where is the next growth segment coming from? that is concerning everybody behind me now as they leave for the day. what happens tomorrow who knows but we're looking for the next growth metric. liz: now it is called a growth metric. david: we'll answer all the questions in the next 45 minutes so don't move. yahoo! reporting earnings just moments ago. let's get more from the numbers from nicole petallides on the floor of the stock exchange. >> a lot to talk about yahoo!. obviously new leadership. let's do the breaking news first which is the numbers coming out. what we're seeing eight eight cents a share beat analyst estimates 24 cents. that is earning per share. revenue came in light, 1.7 billion versus analyst estimates of 1.1 billion. revenue is trade and they're trading down in the after-hours. yahoo! has been under intense scrutiny since marisa mayer came over in july, a former google executive. taking over yahoo! and doing a great job some would argue. the stock is up over 52 weeks. the i is up for the y
in the after-hours, if people are short-covering they're doing it obviously in a more difficult environment. david: who would have guessed it was in double digits less than a year ago it is trading over 200. it hasn't traded over 200 a share since september 14th, 2011. this is long way coming. liz: long way to go. david: have you been to the airport recently? you go to the airport all the time. you go home to the airport to get back to new jersey. airport delays as faa furloughs begin to kick in. liz: rich edson at the airport. what are you hearing overall about the situation, rich? overall we got hundreds of delays yesterday. airline association says we could see up to a few thousand delays because of this when you look at this, go around the country, there are delays in charlotte, there are delays elsewhere. faa is saying there are delays basically close to coast. as far as specifics are concerned they could not provide us with any ties of numbers. that has a number about folks, especially republicans in congress say this is entirely structured by the faa to inflict what they say is maxim
our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >>> first reaction was is my wife okay, 4 months pregnant, she is in boston right now for work as part of marketing at the boston marathon. >> i wanted to run and i am so grateful i can be out here and my heart goes out to everybody. >> people in the bay area are reacting tonight to the tragedy in boston. that includes bay area runners who took part in the boston marathon. local organizations say they are trying to get in touch with members who took part in the race who make sure they are okay. >>> president obama vowed to bring whoever is responsible to justice and said he and the country stand united with the country. >> they have every single resource necessary to care for the victims and counsel the families and i made clear all american ezstand with the people -- americans stand with the people of boston. >> the facts are still being sorted out. this is being treated as a potential terrorist attack. >> i would ask the house take a moment to recognize the loss of life in boston as the tragedy continues to unfold. california call
continues its 30-year legacy of integrating art into the airport environment with the addition of five new commissions that are as bold and dynamic as the new building. >> this project was completed in record time, and we were able to integrate the artist's early enough in the process that they could work with the architect said that the work that is completed is the work that really helps complement and instill the space as opposed to being tucked away in a corner. >> be experience begins with the glass facades that was designed with over 120 laminated glass panels. it captures the experience of being under or over clouds when flying in a plane. depending on the distance or point of view, it can appear clear for more abstract and atmospheric. the subtle colors change gradually depending on the light and the time of day. >> i wanted to create an art work that looks over time as well as working on in the first glance. the first time you come here, you may not see a. but you may be able to see one side over the other. it features a couple of suspended sculptures. each was created out of a se
to provide a very secure environment. you literally can't do it. if your standard is nobody can be at risk at a large public event, we're never going to have another u 2 concert. there are basic procedures for events like this. they're well established. we've learned from everything from the '96 olympic bombings to what you should do. are this they going to do a review? did we do the due diligence? they'll have to. it will be pretty clear whether that was done or not. and then we'll move on from there and we may learn some things to improve. we've got a pittsburgh marathon coming up, other things. you can't stop these public events. you can't make them perfectly secure, but you can do due diligence. the key point is the best way to stop these attacks is good intelligence, good police enforcement that goes out and finds the perpetrators before they do something. >> you can't protect every inch of a 26.2 mile race of course, that's for sure. james carafano, security expert in washington. thank you so much for being with us. really appreciate it. >> thanks for having me. >> reporter: thanks s
they are able to say if they were small bits of metal place there had intentionally or part of the environment. >> forensic pathologist fox news contributor dr. michael baden live this morning. what do you think? >> i think a lot of information being retrieved not only from the streets, but also from the bodies, the surgeons working on people are removing shrapnel, some of which comes from the bomb. the medical examiner's office this morning will do the autopsies on the three people that died. the first thing they will do identify the bodies but take x-rays of the bodies so they can remove any shrapnel that can be part of the bomb. but they also have two in tact bombs. >> we think. we don't really know that. >> allegedly. if indeed they do -- >> if the early reports are true. >> -- and any bomb that didn't explode there's a probe of information they can check back who made the wires. >> who bought the bags. >> what about in terms of shrapnel for lack of a better word in bodies how can that lead to anything? >> that is part of the bomb. it can telling y you where this of object was purchased, w
there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: the shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments in the victims and in the sidewalk and what they will be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used and look at the components of the bomb. it will tell them if this is somebody who put this together over the internet or is this a bombmaker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to figure out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> federal and state and local law enforcement are coordinating closely. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been lawful's worst fear. a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. >> unfortunately these kinds of settings, whether it's a marathon, football, baseball, social event, concert, are attractive targets. we can't get around it. >> reporter: the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on scene this after
... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] we didn't have u-verse back in my day. you couldn't just... guys... there you are. you know you couldn't just pause a show in one room, then... where was i... you couldn't pause a show in one room then start playing it in another. and...i'm talking to myself... [ male announcer ] call to get u-verse tv for just $19 a month for 2 years with qualifying bundles. rethink possible. oakland police announcing your rest of the murder, five suspects between 14 and 16 years ago have been taking into custody. we have video coming up of the scene boyer was shot and then drove his car down the hill. the suspects are so young is troubling. >> i am deeply deeply concerned by this by the fact that the person responsible for this man's murder ages range between 15 to 16 years old, unacceptable! we notice that the h for the suspect involved in many murders or robberies' are now between 14 and 17 years old. >> catherine >> catherine:president obama heads to boston thursday - for a the fbi is asking people to come for what many feel or anything t
after. it could be a regulatory environment, but it could just be that your job is built around regulate -- making this thing work. so we have a skill set issue, too. in general, they are building protocols for security reasons and a bunch of other things. in general, it is absolutely in existing i.t. people's interests to build a private club because they get to keep their jobs. so they are off doing that. but the broader concern that is articulate it is one of security and control. and the public clout is been generally branded by the enterprise segment as being untrustworthy unless it is backed by a particular promise to have some major brand like microsoft or google or whatever. what has been lacking has been standards related to a customer of visibility to reason about the cloud. but we have some good anecdotal evidence that people will focus on a cloud for a living will do a far better job than you would ever if you were building your own i.t. system. a good way to think about this would be if you look back on wikileaks and what followed, it turned out they were hosting on amazon,
. they are mostly used in environments for the environment, whether it be the sand in the desert or the jungle, it would interfere with the explosive. that has been traditionally their use. that being said, these things are easy to find, easy to make. i don't have to tell you, you can look up on the internet and see the step by step instructions out to do that. and matter of assembling the various ingredients you would do to put it together. that to expand on what he was saying, they are getting a lot of evidence how the bomb was made but they don't have a lot of evidence about who did this or why. the actual evidence that would lead to the person or persons involved. >> this suggests a slightly higher level of them what was first thought yesterday and if so, does that narrow down the net of potential suspects? >> it does. the black powder, the acetone, peroxide, you don't want to let it get went. absolutely right. you want to protect the explosives, the detonator. when this bomb went off, talked to a couple of people and their first reaction was what is happening to people coming back from af
the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and not part of that is education and we have to educate the adults that spend time with the kids and the federal government will come up with the giens and 37 factors or 40 and frankly most of us won't remember and unless we're prosecuting and looking for the elements of the crime and whether we're going to file a case or not. i i think we need to be more global than this and this works and we need to illustrate the things that aren't acceptable? what is the impact on the victim? what is the impact on everyone else? and working together to solve the problem. >> nancy. >> in some school districts and teachers when i brought up this issue i get back "you're not going to change kids being kids. some kids will pick on other kids and in the dynamic girls will be friends today and the queen bee will turn away from some girl and the enemy today and tomorrow it's somebody else, and again i agree with george and so much of this is the responsibilities falls on those adults who actually have a bird's eye ore worm's eye view of what is
on the security environment and based on the capability and capacity of the afghans who will serve -- supply the security when we draw down. ask 10never going to soldiers to do more than 10 soldiers were the work and we will shrink the perimeter figure in afghanistan the kids force protection first and foremost about. >> on facilities, you mentioned returning the situation back to the way it was before the facility was built. do we have a process we go through with the afghanis to decided they would like things re are of no value? >> we have a detailed plan for afghan infrastructure to sustain afghan forces post-2014. some of that is being transitioned from coalition forces to afghans. all the infrastructure above their ability to sustain over time, we have a detailed plan that links the infrastructure the afghans will maintain post- 2014 with the resources we project will be available to sustain that infrastructure and we want to make sure there's a balance between the projected resources and the numbers of facilities the afghans keep. those facilities that cannot be sustained are the ones
in this project. we truly appreciate coming to work in an environment that is sporting our good health and safety. so ultimately we can support yours. we consider this community our community, our home away from home. i would like to assure you that we remain committed to continuing our primary mission. that is to protect the lives and property of the people we serve. thank you very much. >> and so you can find out a little bit more about this facility. i would now like to call up the principal architect responsible for this facility. bill letty. with stacy architect. >> thank you, chief. you know, a little known fact is that every architect wants to design a firehouse. not just because many of us wanted to be fire fighters at some point in our lives, it's because these are really iconic hybrid buildings that we feel -- embody a building that express dignity and security for our community. these are important facilities for our community. when we are working on this project in the office we often joke that firehouse no. 1 is like a block on steroids with really big machines in the garage. it's
with other nations to create an environment in which north korea will respond to a call for dialogue. south korea hopes to hold talks with the north on resuming operations at the kaesong industrial complex which is jointly run by the two nations. the north has blocked access to kaesong since early this month amid worsening tensions. >>> aung san suu kyi has spent the past several days in japan laying out her vision for her country's future. >> observers can find encouragements in the new survey. results suggest economic activity has picked up across the country. officials on wednesday released the outcome of the survey carried out in the businesses first 12 districts. they say recovery is apparent in housing and automobile markets. business owners in most districts also say production was on the up. officials reported hiring was unchanged or showed slight improvement but they said labor shortages troubled communication sectors. consumers up spending modestly except in tourism where spending is strong. some bosses in the military sector said they had to layoff employees after last month's au
, they may be hurting others. bank of america became some of the highlighting in a low-rate environment. sf servicing more loans and making less money from them. a report card for the good and the bad of the fed's low rates! the housing market, especially mortgage borrowers, have been the biggest beneficiary that began in 2008. close to 20 million mortgages have been refinanced since then. mortgage applications were up about 5% last week and the mortgage banker's association says the purchase index is at its highest level in two years. >> homes are just incredibly affordable because of these very low rate that is have been there to push down interest rates. >> low interest rates are getting consumerinto auto-showrooms. new car sales could top $15 million this year and negotia negotiating monthly payments that take away much of the new car sticker shock. both consumers and businesses are paying off or refinancing debt. consumer refinancing is at its lowest level in a decade. approximately $70,000 per household. >> we've seen corporations clean up their balance sheets even more so. they've ta
and hang out and she was amazing. >> the environment, the people, everything. it is like everyone has so much energy. >> hey, you are beautiful. and i love you. >> why? because... it is definitely a lot more fun than being inside. >> so far we have had zero problems. it is a long-step process, a lot of thinking and people involved. so we think that we got rid of all of the problems that could happen. they are doing it, and we are doing it and everybody is doing the best that they can. >> it is a wonderful out reach >> come. >> it is beautiful. ♪ >> 7 and a half million renovation is part of the clean and safe neighbor's park fund which was on the ballot four years ago and look at how that public investment has transformed our neighborhood. >> the playground is unique in that it serves a number of age groups, unlike many of the other properties, it serves small children with the children's play grounds and clubhouses that has basketball courts, it has an outdoor soccer field and so there were a lot of people that came to the table that had their wish list and we did our best to make sur
of the environment. >> officials do not know how many people are dead or missing. at this point they are still saying 5- to 15-per have been killed and almost 200 injureed. search-and-rescue teams are going house-to-house certain. >> something ignited and there was a massive explosion. wee every ambulance we can get this way. several first responders, mostly volunteer firefighters, are among the ming. the blast was heard up to 45 miles away. >> get out of here. get out. >> it registered as a 2.1 earthquake. sharon's sister-in-law is in a nursing home near the plants the. >> she said a ceiling collapsed on her. she got to the hospital and they removed her covers she was covered with broken glass. >> portions of the town were completely wiped out with 100 homes and businesses in a five-block radius damageed. >> it is still not known exactly what caused the explosion but investigators are still treating this as a crime seen until they can determine if it was an industrial accident with the a.t.f. leading the investigation. >> tomorrow marks 20 years since another huge fire in waco caught the nation's at
side by side, it's not an issue. it's helped the neighborhood, created more of a safe environment. i have not felt better walking down mission and 6 street because of the prevalence of the medical cannabis in that community. i ask you to please reject these restrictions. it's the wrong venue. this commission as well as any other body repeated with our policy makers go back to the drawing board. >> you are out of your time. >> sorry. i will write a letter. any other speakers whom i haven't called. >> my name is jonelle. we were here last year at the same time opposed the 3 cannabis clubs that did open. mission organic has opened and the police have been called numerous times. their patients feel they have the right to sit inside of a car and smoke the cannabis and drive away. there have also been, they walk around the corner where they go and smoke their pot because they feel they have the right to do so. no, you don't. you have a right to be a good citizen. you don't have a right to cause additional problems in this area. we are not afraid of medical cannabis. i understand the needs
, and local environment. lastly, i want to mention that i find it surprising that the committee will not allow members of the public to yield their time to well respected doctors that have traveled across the country to be here today with us. i do ask you to please vote against approving item number 8 on the rules committee agenda today and thank you so much for your consideration. (applause) >> [speaker not understood]. is there anybody else from the public that wants to testify? seeing none -- please get a card. come on up. >>> hello there. this is my first time doing public comment. and, quite frankly, [speaker not understood] i'll just do what i can because i'm a san francisco state student journalism major and [speaker not understood] minor. and these folks came from across the country and came to san francisco state to do a presentation on the science and all of the huge social implications that come behind having cell phones being next to your body. i mean, for the first time they had a measuring device where they're testing out with my phone. once i made a call or text o
environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >> jacqueline: a total more about the one we get ahead you kids should count yourselves lucky. we didn't have u-verse back in my day. you couldn't just... guys... there you are. you know you couldn't just pause a show in one room, then... where was i... you couldn't pause a show in one room then start playing it in another. and...i'm talking to myself... [ male announcer ] call to get u-verse tv for just $19 a month for 2 years with qualifying bundles. rethink possible. (male announcer): this is the bay area news station, kron 4 news starts now. the f-b-i identifies two suspects in the terror attack. the images the f-b-i hopes to use to identify them. and the attorney for the >> take a look this still images they reveal even more detail. dark shoes pants and jacket and may be a great hooded sweat shirt right there and believed that this is the man who dropped his backpack at the second explosion. both men are known to be armed and very dangerous for news. >> right now is believed to be spied and 15 people may have died. a least a hundred and
the environment, the art and more. >> department of motor vehicles has foregone $22.2 million over two years. >> reporter: the dmv failed to collect $12 million in special plate renewable fees and undercharged by 10 million- dollars. a percentage go to administration but the auditor found on the environmental plates dmv over estimated those costs by $6 million. other special funds were under charged. >> seems like everything is going through the cracks. >> that was ktvu's ken pritchett reporting tonight from oakland. >>> most voters approve of governor jerry brown's new school funding proposal. a poll finds 71% of people support giving more money to school districts with more english learners and lower income earners. 68% say state funding is not enough. >> californians perceive -- school districts and wealthier areas. >> the poll found many believe the resource translates into achievement issues. >>> the housing market is showing signs of life. new numbers show buyers paid $436,000 in march. that was up 7% from february. and up 21.8% from a year ago. however, while prices are up sales are d
in an environment that is safe and free of coercion. planned parenthood is a important part of many san francisco an's lives and often the only healthcare that many regularly received. patients are supporters and and the doctors that serve. and on the election campaigns. >> next speaker, please. >> hi, my name is jamie glen and i represent the 40 days for life in san francisco, and i want to thank you for having this legislation and for meeting with us last week. and as i shared with you before, we are deeply concerned about reports of harassment and intimidation, my husband and i moved here six months ago so i am unfamiliar with the long history, that is described and i have small children myself and so i am not available for every hour of sxwis so i can attest to whatever and while i am doing all of those other moments and i think that if i take a step back and regardless of all of that, i think that it is important to realize that both sides here may are may not have an agenda. that obviously the prolife that life begins at conception and there is a point of view that is not expressed by those wh
the state failed to collect as much as $22 million meant for causes ranging from the environment to veterans. the department of motor vehicles undercharged and famed to collect fees on inactive plates. a separate investigation last year found that money from a september 11th memorial plate was diverted to other use. >>> twitter launched a new music discovery app today. the app is called hashtag music. it suggests songs and music users may like. the songs are streamed through other subscription based services. it runs on the iphone. >>> back to our continuing coverage of the boston marathon bombings. surveillance videos and cell phones have become crucial. authorities already have another high-tech tool that may come in handy at future events. >> reporter: it is still working on a policy for purchasing and using unarmed drone. they cited the terror attack in boston as a reason to use the craft. >> if you had a different aerial perspective of that area, you could capture people coming and going. it'd be a very useful tool. >> reporter: the sheriff says he could see a use for the drone to patro
for joining us today. i have worked with conway, in many capacities to create a environment that supports innovation and we are in many regards the innovation capitol of the world and i am so proud to see this effort launched here today. as mayor, i have focused on jobs, as a top priority and making sure that our youth get quality education and training them to be able to compete for the jobs of the 21st century economy. the fact is and i have said this often, you can't give a job to a dead youth. you can't tell that youth not to lose hope. and that they can succeed no matter where you come from for too long. we have seen too much violence in our communities and it must end. yesterday i signed into law the nation's first ban on possession of halopoint ammunition in san francisco. we worked closely with supervisor cohen to introduce this legislation. these extra deadly bullets have no place in our streets. we are also creating an early warning system to alert us when individuals make massive purchases of ammunition, because even if there is a remote possibility we can prevent another trage
license plates in california is supposed to be used to support special causes, such as the environment or arts but the state auditor says dmv has collected millions less than it should be from the program. our coverage of the manhunt for suspect number 2 in the boston bombings continues right after the break. don't forget you can always follow our coverage at ktvu.com and mobile ktvu with you, stay with us, much more ahead here on ktvu channel 2. send comments to comments@captioncolorado.com captions by terry james, caption colorado, llc. card hassles? introducing chase liquid. the reloadable card that's easy to activate and can be used right away. plus, you can load cash or checks at any chase depositfriendly atm and checks right from your smartphone. get rid of prepaid problems. get chase liquid.
, to their environment, their friends, school, athletics. there wasothi unusual in their behavior. nothing unusual in their language to suggest that there was the slightest degree of unrest, any hatred, any anti- american. anything unusual about them. i am afraid this may signal perhaps another kind of terrorist, similaro wha they called grassroots terrorists. they are on assuming. they are assimilated. and we have immigrants that take advantage of the freedoms and liberties year. maybe they were not the way in 2009 and 2010. something may have turned them in the meantime. it is important to figure out what it was. >> ok, now that people are doing the job that he did for so long, the people trying to make america safe, how do you tackle this kind of threat when there's no intelligence beforehand? >> i think there is no way to be totally analytic about this kind of incident when there s no intelligence, no information, no signs. no signs about the individuals. there are only two ways this could have been avoided. had there been signs or were they were apprehended or cancel the marathon. i do not th
all have to work on it. >> that problem he said is damage to the environment, both long term and immediate. nowhere is it more pressing than china. in city after city, the delegation saw firsthand the air pollution program that evokes images of los angeles in the 1960s and '70s. here wearing a mask outdoors is a fashion statement. global wind patterns is not just a threat to the chinese. >> we feel the impact of it eventually. i think there are opportunities for both sides to collaborate. >> in meetings with chinese officials, the governor found out what works. from tail pipe exhaust laws to air quality districts. >> they know our programs well. they have been studying. >> that may help explain the agreements on the visit that brown signed with chinese officials. four agreements in all. >> china has the largest economic body and largest energy consumers and largest audio consumers and emitters. so we have a lot of opportunities in the future. >> china's challenges are not a lack of political energy as they are the source of the physical energy. coal. railroad cars full of coa
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